Blog

DEADLINE EXTENDED! - HUD Secretary’s Award for Excellence in Healthy Homes

The HUD Secretary's Award for Excellence in Healthy Homes emphasizes the importance of healthy housing in enhancing the health and well-being of people and communities. It also provides a national platform to display results from programs with different scopes, funding, and resources.
 

The HUD Secretary's Award for Excellence in Healthy Homes emphasizes the importance of healthy housing in enhancing the health and well-being of people and communities. It also provides a national platform to display results from programs with different scopes, funding, and resources.

The NEW deadline for submissions is May 29, 2024. 

Learn More

Award criteria includes promoting health equity, innovative approaches, best practices, policies, research, and community engagement to reduce health risks, environmental hazards, and substandard housing for underserved communities. The winning nomination should describe elements that can be replicated in other parts of the country.

Areas to be reviewed:

Health Equity (25 points): Information regarding how the program affects a group that is more affected by a particular social risk factor and health outcome, as well as specifics on how the program motivates this group to succeed or make progress.

Health Impact on Population (20 points): Information on the program's health results, such as data on medical usage (e.g. emergency room visits, hospital stays, healthcare expenses), school or work absences, self-reported or measured symptom improvements, and reduction of harmful resident activities (e.g. tobacco or pesticide use).

Impact on Physical Environment (20 points): Information on how the program reduces environmental risks like lead-based paint, asbestos, combustion gases, and toxic chemicals, as well as home safety hazards and other effects. Nominators need to explain how enhancing Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) would improve the health of residents.

Policy Innovation (15 points): Explain how the policy has affected a health or housing issue that was previously ignored or highlight any enhancements to current programs. Policies do not have to focus on new issues, but they should all show creativity in addressing existing concerns.

Partnership/Collaboration (10 points): Explain the process of developing and implementing the program and the involvement of partnering organizations in different roles. These collaborating entities do not have to be official partners and might have been involved in only certain stages of the program's development or execution. The text should determine if formal partnerships exist and discuss current initiatives to synchronize activities. Nominators must specify if the program received backing from philanthropy, government, or other sources, and the type of support given.

Sustainability (10 points): Explain how the program will continue to make a difference in the future. When policy changes are made regarding laws or regulations, it is enough to simply show that they are expected to be permanent, such as through the absence of a sunset clause in the law or ongoing industry approval. In order to ensure the long-term viability of the program, nominators must outline both permanent and temporary funding sources.

Submit Now

The HUD Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes' mission is to help all Americans, especially children and other vulnerable populations in low-income households, reach their full potential by making homes safe and healthy.  Learn more.


Contributors

    Contributors

      Member Programs


      Multi-Family Insurance Program


      Facilities Maintenance Buying Program



      2024 NAHMA Drug-Free Kids Calendar
      Order Yours Today!